Monday, April 20, 2015

Photolucida 9/10 Prepared


The prints from Autobiography in Water (eight pieces plus two sketchbook mock-ups for Hearst Castle and Kirkham Hot Springs) and Art Department (twelve images including the vinyl text on the cover of the case) are printed.


I wish I was further along on the water series and could bring ten completed depictions but there is only so much I could do after losing the month of March.


It was a superhuman task to get to this point over the last two weeks and I force myself to remember that with the exception of the two water photographs from Texas, all of this art was created in the last eleven months. I have never been able to produce so much during the school year and for that I am most grateful.

Sculpture Chalkboard: Before and After



More text occurred on chalkboards in the Sculpture lab this week in preparation for Photolucida. Kenton's writing is on top while mine is on the bottom (not trying too hard to imitate it). It was my first encounter with an earth colored board.

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Photolucida 7/10 Prepared


 It is about time! The old website is updated at long, long last.

"Sketch: The Art of Study"

Currently on view at Gordy's Fine Art and Framing Company through 2 May 2015, Sketch: The Art of Study (curated and contents organized by Braydee Euliss).







My friend and fellow artist, James Luckett, pressured me into rejoining Instagram in November 2013 after a year’s self-imposed hiatus. This folder contains the successes and failures and sources of inspiration for 3/4 of the photographs found @jacindarussellart. My process is often the antithesis of “instant” where I preplan and collect images for days, weeks or months. The contents seen here show the preliminary steps of the images found on Instagram and those, in turn, are a “sketch” for my greater conceptual practice.

Jacinda Russell 2015

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Photolucida 6/10 Prepared


 
Confetti in the Office Drawer and Freight Elevator, 2015

Reshoot photographs that were not quite right, edit and print for portfolio = check.


Redfish Lake, Idaho (After Rebecca Solnit) 30" x 20" print made, jars soaked and painted, installed in the gallery, mock-up installation documented, and 13"x19" printed for portfolio all within 12 hours = check.

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Amelia and Laurie Conquer Erwin Wurm's "Euclidean Exercises" at the IMA

... while Jacinda relished in the excuse that she is recovering from surgery and could not participate.



The museum guard convinced us that lying sideways on the plank was best. Amelia held on for nearly a minute in that position and aced the foot balancing exercise.


Laurie, on the other hand could have taken a nap in this position. She held on for well over a minute with such ease, it hardly looked like a challenge.


None of us wanted to turn into Wurm's One Minute Sculpture Forever. Euclidean Exercises is still on view at the Indianapolis Museum of Art until the 21st June.

 
P.S. This may be the ugliest/least inviting art museum bench I have ever seen.
Signed,
The Hater of All Things Beige

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Photolucida Reviews 3/10 Prepared


The take-aways are printed! Yes, I know I need to learn Indesign in my spare time and figure out how to make text look decent. In the meantime, everyone can take it as it is. I made one for each series I will bring. I still have three more photographs to take, edit and print. Nothing like down to the wire stress = the story of my life.

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Burial (always)


Jacinda Russell, The Burial of Three People, Two Places, and One Time Period: Place 1 at Double Negative, 2009

As the end of the semester draws to a close and the earthworks road trip approaches, the burial of objects is on my mind. I have no plans to inter anything this trip, preferring instead to observe. I cannot help but be reminded of the past, however, as distant as it may be.

The passage below is from an article we read in the Space, Land and Concept... course this month which brought back memories in terms of why I am compelled to complete this action.

"The act of burial or placing into the ground and receiving from it, a cause-and-effect process, marks our intimate relationship with the earth. On the one hand, it indicates passing, returning to the soil, disintegration and transformation; on the other, generation and life-giving, placing in the ground for the purpose of planting. It is also a metaphor for human intelligence and transcendence through the communication of ideas..."

Agnes Denes in "Notes on Eco-Logic: Environmental Artwork, Visual Philosophy and Global Perspective"

[Congratulations to Agnes Denes the award winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship this month.]

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Emporia State Visiting Artist Lecture



Emporia State University, March 2004 (photo by Eric Conrad)


At the end of February, I visited Emporia State at the invitation of my dear friend, Eric Conrad. I first spoke here in 2004 and was happy to return to present the Stalking Artist: In Pursuit of Home series and visit students in a digital photography course. Here are some random images from the visit:


Emporia State: Where Art Departments are Tornado Shelters.


If only I had a story to tell on these rotating chalkboards.


Ever since starting the Art Department series, I am fascinated with taking quick snapshots of other classrooms in the pedagogical environment. Here is one from the Art Ed classroom....


... and jewelry display case.


The view from Eric's old (non Chair of the Art Department) office and poster advertising his Ball State University visiting artist talk.


A small detail in Yoonmi Nam's Lawrence, Kansas studio featuring one of Eric's sculptures with a cast on her arm.


Emporia State University, February 2015 (photo by Eric Conrad) - we couldn't find the pointer from eleven years ago so chalk was used instead.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Photolucida Portfolio Reviews: 2/10 Prepared


The text was printed and is now installed on my portfolio review box. Might as well bring the one work of art that will be displayed as vinyl letters (not a singular photograph) in the form that it will be viewed.

Monday, April 6, 2015

A Passage from "Apologia"


I encountered an old copy of Barry Lopez's essay "Apologia" in my office a few weeks ago. This passage will be my mantra this summer as I explore a new country that I never imagined visiting for the Autobiography in Water series: Iceland. I received a grant (another summer stipend much like the one that helped me produce From Venice Beach to the Venice Biennale in 2011). Let the research begin.

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Easter Eggs Year Five

After typing the subject line above, I am in shock this is the fifth Easter post. Every time I see an artwork featuring an egg that I like, I save it for this annual event. The last year has been sparse so please forgive the fact that there are only three images.


Jo Ann Callis, From the Grid Series


Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari, Toiletpaper Magazine


Eugene Ellenberg, Mother

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Photolucida Porfolio Reviews: 1/10 Prepared


I do not have my portfolio printed nor have I designed and ordered my promotional take-aways (time is running out) but I do have the reviewer bios ready to go. Sadly, my partner in all events photographically stressful and often far away, will not be joining me this year. Amelia will be with me in spirit though. Yes she will.

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Globes Part 6


X-ray of a Celestial Globe by Benjamin Martin after 1757

My mother bought me this book for Christmas and I was drawn to the ancient forms and the alteration of the globe into other functional objects (toys, umbrellas, etc.). In the x-ray above, one can see the nails and support pillar. There is also a bag of lead shot inside.


Dissected Globe Educational Game, c. 1866


Dissected Globe Educational Game, c. 1866


Drawing of a Terrestrial Globe





Pocket globes (!) with Interior Celestial Globe, c. 1715 [I will take one of these please]


From Globes: 400 Years of Exploration: "Martin Behaim’s globe, made in 1492, is thought to be the oldest surviving terrestrial globe. The sources are Ptolemaic and medieval maps, information from Marco Polo. The most remarkable features is that the Americas are not shown, for the globe was completed before Christopher Columbus returned from his westerly voyage."


Terrestrial Umbrella Globe, c. 1860


Francis Benjamin Johnston, A Lesson in Geography in Washington, DC, 1899

Back to the 20th and 21st century:


Mari Mahr, Unconsciously Perhaps, 1988


Olivia Locher, How to See North America


Sage Lewis, Cyanotype Globe [Check out Sage's recent works in her Doha, Qatar studio]

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Satellite Views of Land Art

I rediscovered this link recently when wondering what a satellite view of Lightning Field looks like (not much as it turns out). Wishing I had thought to incorporate this perspective in the 2009 earthworks project but happy I am able to use it as research this year.


Michael Heizer's Double Negative


Robert Smithson's Amarillo Ramp
 

Nancy Holt's Sun Tunnels